Have You Visited Florida Lately?

The state of Florida is an awesome place to visit and many people love it so much that they end up calling it home. Regardless of whether you want to live in FL or not, however, it certainly is an area that is worth the visit. That is especially true if you live in the northern states and you are chilled by the winter weather. A trip to Florida can be a welcome relief and it can help you to get a little bit of warmth in the middle of the winter months.

You don’t really need to travel far into Florida in order to begin enjoying some of what it has to offer. Most people who come to Florida are going to come down the East Coast on I-95 and just across the Florida line is Jacksonville. This city is an excellent place to stop and it has a lot to offer to those who are interested in taking a vacation. You can even visit the Jacksonville Beaches and head south from there.

Traveling south in FL from Jacksonville, you will soon pass a number of East Coast vacation destinations, including Daytona Beach. This is another excellent opportunity for you to stop, take a look at the Atlantic Ocean and enjoy some sunshine. Don’t stay too long, however, because you want to travel even further south until you get south of West Palm Beach.

Once you hit the area of West Palm Beach, you are entering into what many people refer to as “South FL.” There are so many things to see and do from Fort Lauderdale and Miami all the way down to the keys. This is a vacation of a lifetime and if you are dealing with colder weather in the northern states, it can warm your bones and provide you with plenty of sunshine memories.

Mitch Haniger hits a grand slam in his return, leads Mariners to 7-6 win over Tampa Bay

The Mariners’ Mitch Haniger, center, celebrates with Kyle Seager, right, and Nelson Cruz left, after Haniger hit a grand slam off Tampa Bay starting pitcher Jake Odorizzi. (Chris O’Meara/AP)

ST. PETERSBURG, Fla. — There were no remnants of his once mangled lip. No bruising around his mouth or nose. No signs he was ever hurt.

A person unfamiliar with what happened to Mitch Haniger wouldn’t know that he was force-fed a 96 mph from the Mets’ Jacob deGrom in a scary moment that landed him on the disabled list with a severely lacerated upper lip, a small fracture and a concussion.

There was no mental scarring either. Haniger swore that the memory of that scary moment never once bothered him after he was cleared to play baseball again.

“Zero, to be honest with you,” he said. “It’s a fluke thing. It wasn’t the easiest thing to get over. But as soon as I got back into the batter’s box, I felt fine. I’m not timid. I’m not scared of anything up and in, just like I was before.”

Chaptersdescriptions off, selectedsubtitles off, selectedcaptions settings, opens captions settings dialogcaptions off, selected

This is a modal window.

Scott Servais talks about James Paxton’s injury (2:41)

Then he went out and proved it Saturday. Activated from the disabled list that morning and inserted into the starting lineup that night, Haniger singled in his first at-bat and then crushed a third-inning grand slam to ignite the Mariners to a 7-6 victory.

With their fourth straight win, the Mariners improved to 63-61 and 21-9 in their last 30 road games.

Of course, there had to be some late-inning drama. Closer Edwin Diaz, who struggled badly in his previous outing, was brought in to close out the game with a two-run lead. But former teammate Logan Morrison got him for a pinch-hit solo homer with one out. Diaz coolly retired the next two batters to notch his 27th save.

Clad in a modified batting helmet with an extended flap to protect his cheek and jaw, Haniger looked a little like a gladiator in the batter’s box.

“As far as vision goes, it’s been fine,” he said. “It was weird getting used to swinging because it will hit your arm when you swing and miss. And it feels heavier; here’s a whole piece of the helmet that weighs down one side. Running is weird with it.”

But he felt no weirdness driving a 1-0 cutter that was up in the zone over the wall in left off Rays starter Jake Odorizzi.

Seattle added to its lead an inning later. Yonder Alonso scored Jean Segura from second with a single to center. And Nelson Cruz continued his torrid pace, launching a two-run homer to right field. Tthe umpires initially ruled it a double as the ball hit off a railing behind the fence and bounced back into play. But after a 45 second review, the umpires reversed the call and Cruz had his 31st homer of the season, giving the Mariners a 7-2 lead.

It gave Cruz 100 runs batted in with 38 games left to play.

Starter Ariel Miranda gave the Mariners a decent outing, using the ample run support to his advantage. Over the first five innings, he allowed just two runs, earning him a chance to start the sixth inning with a 7-2 lead and get a quality start. But it didn’t happen. After not allowing a homer for five innings, he served up a solo smash to left-center to Steven Souza Jr. For the Cascade standout, it was his 26th homer of the season and it ended Miranda’s outing.

But his replacement, Emilio Pagan, wasn’t much better. Pagan gave up a single and then served up a two-run homer to Lucas Duda to right-center that cut the lead to 7-5. Pagan was able to get two outs and Marc Rzepczynski came in and ended the inning with a strikeout of Kevin Kiermaier.

Wild things AL wild-card standings: Team W-L GB N.Y. Yankees Minnesota L.A. Angels Kansas City xxxx Seattle

Source Article

At Tampa fundraiser, Rick Kriseman celebrates regional cooperation

Although not universally embraced (most prominently by some conservative Hillsborough Republicans), most observers considered the Cross-Bay Ferry pilot project last winter and spring a success.

The ferry was also a positive example of the region coming together on at least one project to deal with the vexing issue of transportation.

Championing the plan, St. Petersburg Mayor Rick Kriseman went hat-in-hand to local governments in Hillsborough, Tampa, Pinellas and his own City Council to raise $350,000 in total to get the project off the ground.

At Tampa’s Mise en Place Thursday night, the mayor celebrated the collaboration.

“There was a $1.6 million impact on our communities,” he said, calling it a first step in the path of continued cooperation to improve a desultory transit system in the Tampa Bay region.

“If we want to keep our millennials to stay here,” he added, “if we want to attract businesses here, we have to talk transit. And we just can’t talk about it, we have to do something about it … and we did it in a way that it hadn’t been done before.”

The mayoral campaign in St. Pete is moving to Tampa this week.

While Thursday’s Tampa fundraiser — before a group of about 30 progressive Democrats — was his second such event this summer, Kriseman’s chief opponent, Rick Baker, will also trek to Tampa Friday morning to speak during Cafe Con Tampa at the Oxford Exchange.

Now down to the last 18 days of the primary, the only suspense in the race is whether Kriseman can hold Baker below 50 percent, giving him two more months to chip away at a lead Baker has maintained since before entering the race in May.

Throughout his ten minute speech, Kriseman lightly chided Baker, saying that he was proud of the deal that he made with the Tampa Bay Rays which allowed them to speak with officials in Hillsborough County. He remains confident that the team will ultimately choose to return to a redeveloped Tropicana Field.

Baker said he would not have made that deal.

And without name-checking Baker, Kriseman said the public would always know where he stands on the issues.

“I’ll answer questions. I’ll answer questionnaires. I’ll answer questions during debates even if they’re uncomfortable,” he said. “I think that it’s important that the community who’s electing a mayor knows what their values are, their beliefs are, knows what their principals are and that person communicates what those things are.”

Team Kriseman (and now the Florida Democratic Party) are emphasizing how Baker isn’t saying much about the latest actions from the president of the United States, beginning with the fact that he has not said if voted for Donald Trump. Whether that argument works in a race with plenty of local issues remains unclear.

Kriseman also talked about his belief in man-made climate change and that he was the first St. Pete mayor to hang the Pride (and Carter G. Woodson African American) flag over City Hall.

The Democrat also bemoaned record levels of campaign spending in the race; he’d rather see the money go to nonprofit groups to help bring people out of poverty or assist those who are mentally ill and homeless, but hey, the system is what it is, so he has to compete, because to date he’s being outgunned in that category.

Baker leads the financial arms race, raising nearly $600,000 for his political action committee, and $355,000 on his own.

Comparatively, Kriseman raised $324,000 from his political action committee, and $352,000 on his own.

Among local Democrats in attendance for the event were Ed Turanchik, Pat Kemp, John Dingfelder, Mark Hanisee, Gary and Jane Gibbons and Ione Townsend.

Related

Source Article